An introduction

New AOA CEO: ‘We need to hear from you’

AOA CEO Kevin Klauer, DO, EJD, asks the osteopathic medical profession to share what they think the AOA of tomorrow should look like.

New AOA CEO Kevin Klauer, DO, EJD, is incredibly excited and enthusiastic about leading the association into the future. In the video above, he introduces himself to the osteopathic medical profession and shares his thoughts on its current state.

“In my first week on the job, it’s already clear that this organization is in great shape, with a dedicated staff and Board of Trustees working to serve you,” Dr. Klauer says. “Together we will be working to create an osteopathic community that you will be proud to be a part of.

‘Continued success in the future’

“And together, we will collectively strengthen our truly distinctive profession, while recognizing our rich history of selfless service and positioning osteopathic medicine for continued success in the future.”

What should the AOA of tomorrow look like to best serve the profession’s needs? Dr. Klauer welcomes insights and input from the osteopathic community. Submit yours to ceo@osteopathic.org.

Related reading:

More than $1 million in funding awarded to osteopathic researchers 

An emergency physician and health care executive will be the AOA’s next CEO

4 comments

  1. I’m a very proud DO, but I have a number of concerns. The AOA does not appear to be as strong or organized as it needs to be for the massive growth we are experiencing in osteopathic graduates. I advise for the Pre-SOMA chapter and it has been very difficult to get support from the AOA to help educate pre-medical students on my campus, even trying to reach a person who would return my call or e-mail has been very difficult.
    2) When I have spoken with leadership in the past, there is really no recognition that one of the enormous concerns those of us in primary care have is our crushing student loan debt. I will not have mine paid off until I am 80 yrs old. I lived frugally and it has still affected every career choice I have made, like so many others. If we want to promote primary care, we need to find a way to support it financially. It will take efforts all the way to Washington.
    3) ACOFP is a very strong organization, thank goodness. But Family Medicine needs help pushing back against movements in Primary Care Redesign from healthcare organizations like Kaiser who are working hard to make family medicine obsolete. They would like to replace what we are and what we do with nurse case managers, advanced practitioners, and Internists / Pediatricians. These efforts are taking away the opportunity to connect with patients as we do every day in well visits and follow ups, which helps us reach a diagnosis sooner and we now know, also protects us from Burnout.

  2. If you really want to save our profession for the future in light of the merger with ACGME, then I strongly suggest eliminating the timed board certificates. This would be a great incentive to maintain DO certification. The timed certificates have NO scientific basis, are wildly unpopular with practicing (as opposed to academic) physicians, and were only introduced to the osteopathic world “because the MD’s are doing it”. Further, it’s just the right thing to do.

    1. This is what I sent to the AOA…

      My concerns for the AOA, is the out of touch perception with Board Re-Certification.
      As I just have completed my Re-Certification process for the 3rd time, and seeing how stressful this process is, I can’t help but feel, how out of touch the AOBFP/ACOFP and some of the “Grandfathered” DO’s are.

      Just the fact that some DO’s only have taken a Certification test once and only have to do CME to maintain Re-Certification while a whole generation (such as myself) have stressful Re-Certification
      exams is unbelievable and totally not fair.

      Until I see changes from the AOBFP/ACOFP, I will continue to be skeptical of any organization actually wanting to help me versus only wanting my money,

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