#NOMWeek19

Here’s how DOs and med students across the country are celebrating NOM Week 2019

Happy NOM Week! See how members of the profession are lifting each other up and spreading the word about osteopathic medicine.

It’s that time of year again!

National Osteopathic Medicine (NOM) Week is April 14-20, 2019. The goal of NOM Week is to raise awareness of osteopathic medicine and celebrate the profession. Leaders in the osteopathic community, medical students and advocates are observing NOM Week in myriad ways, some of which involve eating cake, petting dogs and learning sign language.

We found DOs and members of the osteopathic family who were excited to express their osteopathic pride on social media. Here’s a sampling:

 

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Destress during #nomweek19 with doggie snuggles

A post shared by Campbell Medicine (@campbell__med) on

 

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What a way to start off NOM Week than by ShaDO Day at Touro University California! Organized to educate visitors about the Osteopathic Medicine Physician led by our very own Faculty and Students! • • • With Workshops ranging in Osteopathic Manipulative Manipulation, Ultrasound, Suturing, Laparoscopy, Intubation and Physical Exam many visitors were able to engage in ShaDO Day! • • • Thank you to our faculty Dr. Melissa Pearce and Dr. Sean Maloney as well as the student volunteers who came out and helped with the event. It wouldn’t have been possible without you guys! Please check out our upcoming events to see what else is in store this week for #nomweek19 !

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Happy National Osteopathic Medicine week! #nomweek19 One of the things that is unique to Osteopathic Medicine compared to Allopathic Medicine is the incorporation of Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) into a comprehensive treatment plan for our patients. One of my professional goals is to increase awareness about OMT and how it can help patients with many common medical problems. Pain is just one of many conditions that it can help with and has the potential to improve outcomes, decrease cost of treatment, and decrease the use of certain medications. To help increase awareness, I have gone on the radio, been on podcasts, spoken to high schools, colleges, and public events. It is an absolute blessing to be able to help people on a daily basis in such a meaningful way! . . . . . @aoafordos #dopridephotocontest #osteopathicmedicine #osteopathy #osteopathicmanipulation #cranialosteopathy #medicine #health #healthandwellness #physician #doctor #mobileosteopathy #pregnancy #baby #babies #newborn

A post shared by Dr Matthew Barker (@drmatthewbarker) on

 

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#Repost from @do_catoe for #nomweek ・・・ Today I completed my last clinical rotation…my last day of school forever. As a young boy I was called ‘socially immature’ by a teacher, and ‘good time Charlie’ by another. While those may have been true, I believe it has been that spirit which has carried me through the stressful and grueling weeks, months, and years of medical school. Becoming a doctor was never something that boy dreamed of, and my path to medicine has been anything but routine. When I started this journey sophomore year of college my primary goals were to succeed, to make my family and friends proud, and to be proud of myself. I haven’t always gotten it right. I’ve made plenty of mistakes along the way, but those things have all lead to this day. In a month, I can add Doctor to that list of endearing names. To the socially immature, good time Charlie: I hope you’re proud kid, I hope you’re proud. #nomweek19 #futuredo #doctorsthatdo #osteopathicmedicine @aoafordos @aacom_do

A post shared by VCOM – Carolinas (@vcomcarolinas) on

For further reading

U.S.-trained DOs recognized as equal to MDs in 20 African countries

6 osteopathic researchers to know for National Osteopathic Medicine Week

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