Civic leaders

TouroCOM-Harlem receives community service award from the NAACP

The NAACP recognizes the medical school’s efforts to increase the number of underrepresented minorities in medicine.

The osteopathic medical profession has a long history of providing medical care in underserved areas. Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM-Harlem) in New York continues that tradition by training DOs to work in underserved communities. Recently, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Mid-Manhattan Branch honored the medical school’s commitment to minorities and underserved patient populations with its Community Service Award.

The NAACP was impressed by TouroCOM-Harlem’s efforts to increase the number of underrepresented minorities in medicine through its community service programs, including:

  • MedAchieve, an after-school mentoring program for underserved Harlem high school students interested in medicine.
  • Mentoring in Medicine, a program that brings high school students to TouroCOM’s anatomy labs and encourages them to pursue careers in medicine.
  • Fund for Underrepresented Minority Students, a scholarship fund to help underrepresented minorities attend the medical school.

“TouroCOM has excelled in its commitment to expanding educational opportunities and careers in medicine, science, research and technology to underrepresented minorities and African-Americans while also establishing linkages and programs for elementary and high school youth,” said Geoffrey E. Eaton, president of the NAACP Mid-Manhattan Branch, in a statement.

The award was presented at the NAACP branch’s recent 14th Annual Freedom Fund Luncheon.

2 comments

  1. Shame on Touro for accepting inferior candidates just to comply with what seems to be affirmative action. Medical schools should only and always accept the strongest candidates, which has nothing to do with skin color. Ridiculous that the AOA thinks this should be honored. It’s a clear blow to the integrity of the medical school admission process. Hypothetically, passing over a non-black candidate who is smarter and worked harder to accept someone on the basis of their color is unethical. I’m really disappointed.

    1. You obviously have not done your research on the osteopathic schools in the united states. There are several other Colleges of Osteo Med who have upheld their honor to diversity and acceptance of students much more than Touro Univ Osteo Med in Harlem, has done. Your over exaggerated ego filled answer is based on ignorance and biased with financial privileged in the purchase of education and standardized test courses. I question you intellect. By the way I am a black osteopathic physician and mentor many others like myself that certainly would put your narrow qualifications to shame. I applaud every effort made by the AOA to expand the brevity of their vision and quest to make osteopathic medicine one of the greatest sciences in the world!

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