Medical education

DO schools recognized for diverse student bodies

In recent years, several DO schools have taken steps to increase diversity in their student populations.

Increasing the number of minority students in medical school is an operational imperative at some medical schools.

The magazine Diverse Issues in Higher Education recently recognized several DO schools for educating above-average numbers of minority students in their Top 100 Degree Producers 2016 lists, which examined diversity at higher education institutions in the 2014-2015 and 2013-2014 school years.  Of particular note, several osteopathic medical schools significantly increased the number of minority students year over year.

Here are the highlights of their findings:

  • The No. 1 educator of African-American osteopathic medical students for 2014-2015 was Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine in Virginia, which increased enrollment of African-American students by 140% year over year.
  • The No. 1 educator of Hispanic osteopathic medical students for 2014-2015 was the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine in Pennsylvania, which boosted its number of Hispanic students by 50% year over year.
  • Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences educated six Native American students, the highest number across all osteopathic medical schools.
  • Overall, the New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine had, at 138, the highest number of minority students.
  • Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine in New Jersey increased its number of Hispanic students by 225% year over year.

To learn more, check out the list that explores diversity at osteopathic medical schools. All searchable lists are also available.

For more on diversity in osteopathic medicine, see the following articles:

‘Courageous impact’: Barbara Ross-Lee, DO, trailblazer for women and minorities, retires

Building dreams: New COM reflects diversity of surrounding community

‘Discrimination affects us all’: When physicians experience prejudice

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